Is Lent over yet?

Is Lent over yet?

This is the cry running through my head midway through the second day of Holy and Great Lent.

The second day!

What was happening?!

I love Lent! I love the yearly opportunity to regroup. I love the prayer services. I love the chance to focus on a healthier diet. I love the challenge of quieting down the world and working on the stillness for the sake of my soul.

But this year I am not prepared. My refrigerator is still harboring contraband. My pantry isn’t stocked with enough vegan ingredients to prepare anything more interesting than pasta or rice. And my house is a complete mess. This is not the way I wanted to start Lent.

And then I made the rookie mistake and went on Facebook first thing in the morning! I KNOW! What was I thinking?

Facebook can be a place of encouragement during the fast with recipes and inspiring quotes from the Bible and Elders… but not yesterday. Yesterday every comment was (or seemed to be) an attack on my senses. Unwanted advice, boasts of “holier than thou” comments, delicious vegan meals, and amateur debates on what the Fast really was had me in a tizzy. I must have replied to a snarky comment 20 times before I actually clicked send. And that’s when I realized it was me. I was a the mess.

Was it the detox from removing meat just a week ago? Was it my gluttony searching for a pathetic excuse to eat an egg? Was it my ego needing to be the only online expert? Probably more the last than any of the others.

I do like being a know it all. It’s comforting to think I have it all together.

But I don’t know it all. It’s not realistic. Imagine if the world depended on what I knew. YIKES!

I am, or I should say, I want to be a learner, a grower, a teacher, a friend. I want to be a faithful servant. I want to be a better parent. I want to be a better Christian. I want to use this time to face my challenges and my fears. I want to use this time to remember what I once knew and learn from those who forget less often. I want to show my soul that I value her and therefore want to nurture her so that she may thrive as well.

I am so thankful that Lent isn’t over yet. I have a lot of things I want to accomplish in the next 40 plus days left. It really is such a short time for this little boot camp of ours.  Our sacred time outside of time.

So, I kindly and lovingly remind myself. “Suck in that gut, soldier, and stop your crying.  You’ve got work to do.”

May God grant us a season for reflection, growth and tears- but may they be tears of repentance and not self pity.

Prayer of St. Ephraim

This card is available in our Shop.

 

Training Photo By: Sgt. Benjamin E. Woodle

In Honor of Forgiveness

Psalm 130

From the depths, I have cried out to you, O Lord;
Lord, hear my voice.
Let your ears be attentive
to the voice of my supplication.
If you, Lord, were to mark iniquities,
who, O Lord, shall stand?
For with you is forgiveness;
and because of your law, I stood by you, Lord.
My soul has stood by his word.
My soul has hoped in the Lord.
From the morning watch, even until night,
let Israel hope in the Lord.
For with the Lord there is mercy,
and with him is plenteous redemption.
And he will redeem Israel
from all his iniquities.

Have you ever stayed up, waiting for the sun to fill the earth with light as it rises?  There’s a sense of excitement.  Hope.  Newness.
Forgiveness is like that sweet joy you feel when you see the light fill the sky and you know there is a new day waiting for you.
Forgive.  Ask for forgiveness.
Don’t sit in the dark any longer than you have to.

Today’s JAR

Once in a while a like to post a JAR   It’s “Just a Reminder” of something you probably already knew and forgot.  It’s rarely anything brilliant.  And it’s usually something your Orthodox Grandmother would have told you (if you had one.)

Today’s JAR

February 19 doesn’t start a 40 Day Diet. It starts the Lenten Season. Part of it means we follow the discipline of the Church in choosing what we eat. The other part is we use the time for self reflection, prayer, and repentance.

Many people say “What comes out is more important.”

There is no “More Important.” If you can’t control what goes in, how will you control what comes out…. We shouldn’t be Pharisees but we still need to follow the discipline of the fast to the best of our ability.

 

Remembering the Dead

Why does the Church like to remind us twice a year that we are all going to die?  It’s such a downer.

(Where’s the sarcasm font?)

In reality, I think it’s very important to be reminded that we are all going to die one day and that this life was meant to be temporary.  It helps us remember to stop sweating the small stuff, look at the big picture, forgive and repent.

For the procrastinator in all of us, the Church Calendar has two Saturdays named “Saturday of Souls” where we remember the dead: the Saturday before Meatfare Sunday and the Saturday before Pentecost… the beginning and end of the movable festal calendar.  The other Saturday of Souls services in the beginning of Lent are associated with the ascetics who didn’t have descendants to remember them in prayer and  St. Theodore concerning the Miracle of the Koliva*.

On these memorial Saturdays we offer boiled wheat, a.k.a. Koliva, and ask the priest and those present to pray for our departed family members and loved ones.  I have a friend who pays extra attention to pray for his loved ones and friends who didn’t have children (like the ascetics) and who will probably be forgotten through the generations to come.  As it is, each of us depending on the if we taught our children this sacred tradition or if our names are on a building or invention of some sort, will probably only be remembered for a short time after our death (in comparison to eternity.)

Holy and Great Lent is less than two weeks away and today we are preparing the ingredients for the first Saturday of Souls, February 10, 2018.  Do you prepare Koliva?   Do you offer a list of names of the dead?   How far back do you go?

I highly encourage you to learn how to make koliva.  If you need instructions or a recipe, you can go to an early post for koliva, or if you are a more visual learner, here’s a video.

May their memory be eternal.

Prayer Inside reads:
With the Saints give rest, O Christ,
to the soul of Your servant
where there is no pain,
nor any sorrow, nor any sighing,
…but Life everlasting.
From Orthodox Funeral Service
Item #: 10-002
  • In 361, Julian the Apostate was doing his utmost to restore pagan customs. Knowing that the Christians were accustomed to sanctify the first week of Lent by fasting and prayer, the wily tyrant told the Prefect of Constantinople to have all of the food set out for sale in the markets sprinkled with the blood of animals sacrificed to the gods, so that no one in the city would escape the contagion of idolatry. However, the Lord did not abandon His chosen people, but sent His servant Theodore to outwit the tyrant. Appearing in a vision to Patriarch Eudoxius (360-364), the holy Martyr informed him of what was happening and told him to instruct the Christians not to buy food from the markets but instead to eat kolyva made from grains of boiled wheat. Thus, thanks to the intervention of the holy Martyr Theodore, the Christian people were preserved from the stain of idolatry. The Church has commemorated this miracle ever since on the first Saturday of Great Lent, in order to remind the faithful that fasting and temperance have the power to cleanse all the stains of sin.