Today’s JAR: Experiencing the Fast

Once in a while I write JARs, which stands for “just a reminder.” It’s the stuff you probably already know, but might have forgotten. For example, what is the difference between experiencing the fast and just fasting?

We are about to finish Great Lent and enter Holy Week, and I am wondering if I did a good job fasting. I followed the fasting guidelines in what I did and didn’t eat… Not sure I can say it was to the “best” of my abilities… but now I am wondering if I experienced the fast or just fasted? Meaning, did I let the fast do what it was supposed to do? Did I offer my will to God more during this season? Was I gluttonous? Did I let the food become a distraction? Did I recognize what hunger means and that my souls should hunger for God in the way my tummy grumbled?

But it goes even a little further.

Last week I noticed something interesting during the Pre-Sanctified Liturgy that had to do with experiencing the fast.

Experiencing the Fast

Confession time. Last week I wimped out and chose to eat a late lunch instead of prepare to receive communion for Pre-Sanctified Liturgy. I attended the service all the same. I thought that if I was at least in the church for the service I would receive a blessing via osmosis. Maybe?

Participating in the service on a semi-full stomach changed the experience. First, it was strange because I wasn’t tired. I was actually quite refreshed. What’s wrong with that? It made reading the Psalms a different experience.

In the service we read:

Psalm 129/130 Out of the depths I have cried out to you: Lord, Lord, hear my voice! Let your ears be attentive to the voice of my plea. If you retain sins, Lord, O Lord, who can stand? With you there is forgiveness. For your name’s sake, O Lord, I have waited for you. My soul has waited for your promise, my soul has hoped in the Lord. My soul has trusted in the Lord, from the morning watch till night. Let Israel hope in the Lord, for with the Lord there is steadfast love and in him is full redemption, and he will redeem Israel from all his iniquities.

On the other Wednesday nights, when I properly prepared for communion, by the time the service started, I was tired and hungry. I moved slowly and carefully. I could more easily relate with these words.

But my experience of the fast went a little further.

Waiting on God

Even the verse, “O Lord, I have waited for you. My soul has waited for your promise, my soul has hoped in the Lord.” has a different connotation when we are waiting for communion. When we fast and prepare, we are experiencing what it’s like to wait for God to satisfy our physical hunger, and even our spiritual hunger.

It’s not too late

It’s not too late to experience the fast. Holy Week in coming. The fast continues and there are lots of services offered. Don’t wimp out. Enter into the experience of what the Church is offering.